[CR] Week in Review

Our campaign on Change.org’s Ideas for Change in America is going strong: after a wave of voting this week, our proposal to change the drinking age is now in great shape to take over 2nd place in the Human Rights category and advance to the next round. Have you voted yet? If not, the first round ends next Thursday, so vote today! Once you’ve cast your vote, spread the word on Twitter and Facebook. Check out this week’s headlines for news of a ballot initiative in Washington, a new alcohol use survey in Nebraska, and the view from the back door of the [CR] office after all of this week’s snow…

The view from [CR]’s back door this week. Anyone have a shovel?

Stories this week:

If you missed it yesterday, the Yakima Herald-Republic tracked down a Washington State University student who has created a ballot initiative to lower the state’s drinking age to 19. Cienna Madrid of The Stranger picked up the news and interviewed him to get his take on the issue of binge drinking by young adults.

Nora Leinen, a columnist with the Minnesota Daily, implored local lawmakers to think about the consequences of proposed social host laws before passing them:

“One of the main reasons Minneapolis is pushing the initiative is the large influx of parties it received after St. Paul passed a social host ordinance: a prime example of how underage drinking is simply shifted by restrictive laws, not stopped.

So if the social host ordinance is passed, what will really happen? People may card at house parties and Minneapolis may be praised for taking a stand, but underage drinkers will find another way to continue to drink.

What worries me is the stubbornness of government officials to realize that their methods of restrictive laws aren’t working.”

What’s your take on her column? Let us know in the comments.

The editors of the ASU Herald at Arizona State University offered some advice to students who are concerned about changes in university alcohol policy: drink responsibly, and watch out for one another.

In other news…

Froma Harrop of the Providence Journal discussed the problems that arise when the age of majority is inconsistent. She argued that the Amethyst Initiative’s signatories might have some good solutions to the problem of toxic drinking: “They note that the age restriction hasn’t stopped binge drinking on campus and argue, not without reason, that it has turned alcohol into forbidden fruit begging to be picked. Perhaps teaching young adults how to drink in moderation is the better way to go.”

Nebraska has created a wide-ranging, anonymous survey that will attempt to examine young adults’ attitudes about alcohol and their drinking patterns. Dr. JoAnn Schaffer of the state’s Department of Health and Human Services told WOWT-TV that the survey intends to get to the heart of the culture of toxic drinking: “What does drinking responsibly mean? We spend a lot of time telling people to do that but we don’t give them any guidance on what that means.”

Did we miss something this week? Leave a link in the comments.

Our campaign on Change.org’s Ideas for Change in America is going strong: after a wave of voting this week, our proposal to change the drinking age is now in great shape to take over 2nd place in the Human Rights category and advance to the next round. Have you voted yet? If not, the first round ends next Thursday, so vote today! Check out this week’s headlines for news of a ballot initiative in Washington, a new alcohol use survey in Nebraska, and the view from the back door of the [CR] office after all of this week’s snow…

Stories this week:

If you missed it yesterday, the Yakima Herald-Republic tracked down a Washington State University student who has created a ballot initiative to lower the state’s drinking age to 19. Cienna Madrid of The Stranger picked up the news and interviewed him to get his take on the issue of binge drinking by young adults.

Nora Leinen, a columnist with the Minnesota Daily, implored local lawmakers to think about the consequences of proposed social host laws before passing them:

“One of the main reasons Minneapolis is pushing the initiative is the large influx of parties it received after St. Paul passed a social host ordinance: a prime example of how underage drinking is simply shifted by restrictive laws, not stopped.

So if the social host ordinance is passed, what will really happen? People may card at house parties and Minneapolis may be praised for taking a stand, but underage drinkers will find another way to continue to

drink.

What worries me is the stubbornness of government officials to realize that their methods of restrictive laws aren’t working.”

What’s your take on her column? Let us know in the comments.

The editors of the ASU Herald at Arizona State University offered some advice to students who are concerned about changes in university alcohol policy: drink responsibly, and watch out for one another.

In other news…

In a column for RealClearPolitics.com. Froma Harrop discussed the problems that arise when the age of majority is unclear. She mentioned the Amethyst Initiative’s signatories and the drinking age, writing, “They note that the age restriction hasn’t stopped binge drinking on campus and argue, not without reason, that it has turned alcohol into forbidden fruit begging to be picked. Perhaps teaching young adults how to drink in moderation is the better way to go.

Nebraska has created a wide-ranging, anonymous survey that will attempt to examine young adults’ attitudes about alcohol and their drinking patterns. Dr. JoAnn Schaffer of the state’s Department of Health and Human Services told WOWT-TV that the survey intends to get to the heart of the culture of toxic drinking: “What does drinking responsibly mean? We spend a lot of time telling people to do that but we don’t give them any guidance on what that means.”

Did we miss something this week? Leave a link in the comments.

One Response to “[CR] Week in Review”

  1. Edwin Says:

    The drinking age must be lowered to 18 along with education and licensing. Hopefully, the idea on change.org will be number in the Human Rights category. The referendum in Washington must get enough signatures. Nora Leinen compromises so much in that article that she supports stopping “underage” drinking. Minneapolis must not pass that ageist party law. Froma Harrop is correct in that the Amethyst Initative has came up with non-ageist but good solutions. The survey in Nebraska is important.