Why lower the drinking age now?

In the more than two decades that have passed since its implementation, the 21 year-old drinking age has created a climate in which terms like “binge” and “pregame” have come describe young peoples’ choices about alcohol; in which the law is habitually and thoughtlessly ignored by adolescents and adults alike; in which colleges and communities across the nation are plagued with out-of-control parties, property damage, and belligerent drunks; in which emergency rooms and campus health centers are faced with an alarming number of sometimes fatal cases of alcohol poisoning and overdose on weekend nights; and in which the role of parents in teaching responsible behavior around alcohol has been marginalized and the family disenfranchised. Maintaining status quo in America today is not an option.

We are faced with a law that is out of step with our cultural attitudes towards alcohol, one which encourages violation and breeds disrespect. Historically, we know that during the Vietnam War the 26th Amendment in 1971 provided 18 year-olds the right to vote, the age at which one could be drafted to fight in the war. This constitutional recognition of 18 year-olds as consenting adults was fundamental for guaranteeing the right for 18 year-olds to drink. Again, a quarter century later, we are engaged in a war where many of the soldiers currently serving abroad are under the legal drinking age of 21. And while that historical parallel itself does not provide justification for changing the drinking age, it makes strikingly clear the poor logic behind the assumption that at the age of 18 one is too immature to consume alcohol. If the drinking age were lowered, it would signal a transformation in the relationship our society has with its young adults. Besides engendering greater respect for the law, a lower and more easily enforced drinking age would offer alternative choices for parents and college campuses around the country in shaping responsible drinking behaviors and encouraging informed decisions about alcohol use.

4 Responses to “Why lower the drinking age now?”

  1. Edwin Bonilla Says:

    Enforcement of the ageist drinking age will never solve the problems associated with the drinking age, which the article pointed out. A lower drinking age is important because it will improve the attitudes of young women and young men about alcohol. If the drinking age is lowered to 18, it should be accompanied with other laws which encourage alcohol responsibility for all young women and young men.

  2. Ajax the Great Says:

    “It has to start somewhere, it has to start sometime. What better place than here? What better time than now?”

    –Rage Against the Machine

  3. Edwin Bonilla Says:

    Great song with a great message.

  4. Ajax the Great Says:

    AMEN