WUSTL Student Life: Are We The Blackout Generation?

Amanda Jacobowitz, a columnist with Student Life at Washington University in St. Louis, asked her peers a direct question in her latest column: “Are we the blackout generation?” She argued that her peers have become desensitized to the dangers of toxic drinking and indifferent to the consequences:

“The excessive nature of college drinking is normalized into our culture and has turned into something we don’t even question anymore. When we guzzle down drink after drink, we are inducing memory loss and we are putting ourselves, our health, our relationships, even our lives at risk! Yet, every weekend, we start again, just waiting to see who blacks out next—immune to the consequences.”

Does her account match up with your experience on your campus or in your community? Let us know in the comments.

2 Responses to “WUSTL Student Life: Are We The Blackout Generation?”

  1. Edwin Says:

    The drinking age must be lowered to 18 along with education and licensing. The ageist drinking age is the contributor to the “blackout generation”, although not every university student abuses alcohol. It’s not correct that as Amanda Jacobwitz reported, that many young women and young men treat alcohol as a sport but not a drink, causing consequences which include memory loss. Education and licensing for young women and young men who are 18-20 to consume alcohol is necessary to significantly decrease this.

  2. Asif Says:

    The drinking age must be lowered to 18 along with education and licensing. The ageist drinking age is the contributor to the "blackout generation", although not every unkversity student abuses alcohol. It's not correcf that as Amanda Jacobwitz reported, tyat many young women and young men treat alcohol as a sport but not a drink, causing consequences which include memory loss. Education and licensing for young women and young men who are 18-20 to consume alcohol is necessary to significantly decrease this.;